Needles At Dawn

I actually had a dream about the online embroidery community turning on me last night. It was pretty distressing. What has my life become?

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Brain brain go away, don’t come back ‘til 8:30.

I think this illness is harder for creative people. I’m not saying that it’s not hard for every sufferer, but artists train themselves to see huge bursts of nervous energy and a rapid flow of intense thoughts as a good thing. For example, I tend to forget that I need sleep and balance if I’m ever going to bring all these great ideas to fruition.

This feels appropriate right now:

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The Knitter, the Stitcher, and the Quilter.

No, this is not a “walked into a bar” joke, or a Perraultian fairy tale.

It’s all just in a day’s work.

Today, a knitter (Debs), a quilter (Catherine), and a stitcher (me!), gathered to (hand)stitch together Walthamstow’s Neighbourly Quilt.

Back in May I was just finishing off my first internship with Catherine at her Walthamstow-based Social Enterprise Significant Seams (I’ve just begun my second internship there).

My first jaunt at the Significant Seams Hub was based around a community arts project: the Neighbourly Quilt project featured here.

Significant Seams asked residents of E17 to hand in fabric squares decorated using various textile techniques, or attend a workshop to learn a technique with which to decorate their square. The theme of the square was to be either “something which makes good neighbours”, or “something which I love about Walthamstow”.

We received 68 patches in all; more than we expected, and more than our target!

Catherine and Debs had already spent a couple of sessions hand-stitching the quilt together, and now that I’m back from Scotland, I’m joining in too. Here’s our handiwork:







Here’s (rather) a few of my favourites:














One of Debs’ beautiful pieces
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